Posted October 2, 2007

THE PAINTING AND WALL RESTORATION CONTRACTOR BEGINS ITS MASSIVE REPAIR AND PAINTING PROJECT AT THE ORATORY.

In the photo below, a master painter, Bryon Roesselet of Evergreene Painting Studios, begins the study of the painting schemes that lay below the existing paint job that was done in the early 1960s.

Bryon applies a paint-removing solution and scraps the old layers off to reveal the paint patterns and colors that existed when the Oratory was first built. Once the historic designs are uncovered, photographs are taken and drawings are made of the old paint patterns.

When the old paint layers are removed, the century old patterns and colors are revealed (as you see above). You can see some the overall pattern from this detail from an old photograph of the church taken in the 1930s or 1940s (shown to the right).

In addition to the photographs being taken, tracings (like the one below) are made of the designs.

The purpose of all this work is to help the design architect decide on the colors and patterns for the new painting for the church. Some of this historical painting may provide inspiration and guidance for those responsible for choosing colors and paint patterns that will not only look good in this era, but also reflect the beauty and heritage of what went before. Tradition! Isn't that what we're all about???!!!

The tracings (below) are done with magic marker on clear acetate. The patterns show and the colors are marked in the the portions of the tracing that apply. This is tedious work, but well worth the effort.




SCAFFOLDING FOR THE PAINT WORK GOING UP.

Other scaffolding is being erected in order for the painting specialist to do their work on the walls and detail of the church.


THE PHOTO BELOW MAY GIVE YOU AN IDEA OF HOW HARD THE VOLUNTEERS WORK. THIS PILE OF ROCK AND DIRT HAS BEEN HAULED FROM THE CATACOMBS OF THE CHURCH...USING ONLY WHEELBARROWS, MUSCLE AND SWEAT.

Our heartfelt thanks to all those who have worked so hard in helping in the restoration of the church building.

To view previous photos, click here...